6 Months Since GDPR

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As tomorrow marks 6 months since the implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), please find below commentary from security experts in relation to GDPR.

Chris Mayers, Chief Security Architect at Citrix:

“Today, there is still a strong chance that a number of organisations could be struggling with issues around data sprawl, the volume of personal customer information and uncertainty around data ownership – as our research from around a year ago suggested.

“The poll also found the average large UK business was reliant on 24 systems to manage and store personal data, with one in five (21 per cent) using over 40 systems to do so. Tackling such data sprawl wasn’t easy then and won’t be now if still the case.

“For those businesses still on the GDPR compliance journey, you cannot afford to rest on your laurels. Public awareness of an organisation’s responsibilities around data protection have never been higher – with breach complaints to the Information Commissioner’s Office on the increase. Reputations and revenues are on the line, and now is the time to ensure a long-term GDPR compliance strategy is in place, if it isn’t already.”

Joe Garber, Global Head of Product Marketing: Information Management & Governance at Micro Focus:

 “Having been in force for just six months, the GDPR has changed the face of data protection as we know it – even at this early stage of its implementation. Businesses and consumers are already seeing the positive consequences of compliance. This extends from improved data privacy and security through to organisations discovering the real value of their data.

“Despite the positive steps forward taken by many organisations, some could do more to capitalise on the innovative business drivers that stem from regulatory compliance. Though the GDPR was primarily intended to safeguard identity and data privacy, organisations can leverage this newfound insight into their data in ways that extend beyond the original intent of the regulation.  Armed with this insight – and naturally balanced with appropriate safeguards to protect customer privacy – organisations can not only manage the bottom line but also drive the top line by identifying untapped revenue streams and unmet customer needs, as well as by streamlining processes.

“Companies are starting to realise that GDPR is, in fact, a catalyst for doing a number of things they should have been doing already.  By bridging formerly distinct data silos and having the ability to then apply analytics across all this information, organisations are not only better protecting sensitive information, but also taking necessary steps to increase revenue and improve business processes.”

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